Timetotrade, a UK trading platform, raises funds on Crowdcube for expansion

Timetotrade, a UK trading platform, raises funds on Crowdcube for expansion

timetotrade logo

Timetotrade, a UK web-based trading platform for forex, CFDs, shares, funds and spread betting, is in the last stage of its funding round on the Crowdcube investment crowdfunding platform.

It has set a target of £500 000, offering a 5.88% in equity, bringing the market capitalization of the company to £8.5 million. So far, in the last day of its funding round, Timetotrade has raised £145 480, or 29% of the target sum. The largest investment so far was £60 000.

According to its presentation, Timetotrade is regulated in the UK by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and has 31 000 registered users – investment clubs and individual investors who create half a million trading signals every month. The platform allows users to set up their own trading strategies, test and execute them.

Timetotrade also offers forex and stock charts and technical indicators and analysis, alerts, UK capital gains tax calculator and portfolio management.

The new funding would provide capital for geographical expansion in the UK, Europe and Asia, expansion and acquisition of client base, marketing, launching of the spread betting and CFD platforms, commercializing of the existing technologies and, just in case, a capital buffer for increased regulatory capital requirements.

As per Timetotrade’s business plan, the projected year 3 revenue is £9.1 million, with EBITDA of £4.2 million.

Last week another UK fintech company, Freetrade, which is developing a mobile application for free stock trading, raised £172 000 on Crowdcube, putting the company pre-money valuation at £1.9 million. The initial funding target was £100 000 and the sum had to be raised in two weeks.

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