ThinkMarkets accepts PayPal deposits, withdrawals

ThinkMarkets accepts PayPal deposits, withdrawals

- in All News, Forex Brokers
PayPal

ThinkMarkets, a multi-licensed forex brokerage formerly known as ThinkForex, said on Thursday it has integrated support for PayPal for global payments. The broker allows both deposits and withdrawals via the payment system’s international network.

ThinkMarkets clients are able to transfer money via PayPal to their trading account, regardless whether they use the MetaTrader 4 (MT4) or ThinkTrader platforms.
Traders can transfer money in AUD, USD, SGD, GBP, EUR, NZD, CAD, CHF and JPY.

“The inclusion of PayPal to our vast offering of payment services strengthens our global reach and enables ThinkMarkets’ to offer a more diverse & competitive solution for its clients,” ThinkMarkets CEO and co-founder Nauman Anees said.

ThinkMarkets has a dedicated client account management system called ThinkPortal. There, traders can use various payment methods, including bank wires, Visa and MasterCard bank cards, e-wallets Neteller and Skrill.

PayPal is a US-based global electronic payment system. It supports money transfers in 26 currencies and 203 countries. It offers anonymity and security of transactions – users are not required to provide bank details or credit card information. It is well-known and used by more than 7 million businesses worldwide, including by many forex brokers, including FxPro, Oanda, IC Markets, Alpari, eToro, Fortrade, and UFX Bank.

ThinkMarkets is a trading name of TF Global Markets (UK) Ltd., regulated by the UK Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), and TF Global Markets (Aust) Pty Ltd., licensed by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC). It has offices om Australia, where it originated from, the UK, Australia, Chile, and the UAE.

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